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My 2016 Personal Annual Report

My 2016 Personal Annual Report

Every year I say this has been the best year ever and every year it is true. Daily, I’m grateful for work I love with amazing people. Thanks for being a part of this with me!

Since 2011, I’ve been creating a personal annual report. It’s a dashboard of sorts that tracks my key performance indicators in a visual way. Everything in here is clickable, so dig deeper when something peaks your interest.

I wrote yet another book this year! Our Chart Chooser Cards Kickstarter campaign reached 1,000% of our goal! Wow! And thank you.

 

Want the template I used to create this visual? I’ll distribute it in my next newsletter, so sign up here:


 

4 thoughts on “My 2016 Personal Annual Report
  1. Lynne Pitts says:

    What do the different colors on your visited states mean?

    • Stephanie Evergreen says:

      Very good question. Light blue means I went once and dark blue means I went multiple times. I stated that in last year’s annual report and assumed you studied it so carefully you would remember. Just kidding!

  2. Emily Connors says:

    I love how interactive the report is! Keep up the good work! What did you use to create this?

    • Stephanie Evergreen says:

      I just used PowerPoint, Emily! I’ll send out the file in my next newsletter so you can see how it was done.

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Awesome! Let me know how it goes. Maybe I can swing by next time I'm in Portland. https://t.co/yoAmzHhuUY

RT @jpafford_nisd: I believe this is SO important! Thanks for your POV and honesty! #realtalk https://t.co/krlnnbaPFz

@sara_mayo @guardian Right?! Why is this still a thing????

RT @ecgrim: Very timely & thoughtful post from @evergreendata: "How We Unintentionally Perpetuate #Inequality Part 3" #dataviz #eval #equal

@sara_mayo @guardian Mine were fake news about Hillary and that's definitely not due to my browsing habits.

@guardian great article with questionable ads.

"People assume that the numbers are manipulated and dislike the elitism of resorting to quantitative evidence." https://t.co/OAeFpRtNZ3

RT @GinaJohnsonIR: It's not too early to think about nerdy statistical Valentine's cards. Funny stuff: https://t.co/ibZNIMoVbA. #IRWaterCoo

New Post: How We Unintentionally Perpetuate Inequality Part 3 https://t.co/Xre4r7tUsM#dataviz

New Post: How We Unintentionally Perpetuate Inequality Part 3 https://t.co/Xre4r7tUsM #dataviz https://t.co/TxwYf4wVBV