I write books.

My practical, accessible, immediately useful books show you how to make slides, reports, dashboards, and graphs that look just as pro as you are.

Check your Charts!

I have pulled together research-based design guidelines for data visualizations. Use this interactive guide to rate your visualizations and spot places to improve your work and impress your audiences with clarity and insight.

Snag a Handout!

We break fire code with all the people who cram in the room to see me talk. If you missed seeing me in person, grab a handout. Stay on top of my events and get the most practical visualization and reporting advice by signing up for my newsletter.

 

And this was my host, a real life superhero. The week before our #dataviz workshop marathon, he was fighting wildfires in California. And he still knows you gotta prioritize presenting your data effectively. I have the best job. ♥️ pic.twitter.com/eCisy4kkh0

About 2 days ago from Stephanie Evergreen's Twitter via Twitter for Android

We Need More Research on Data Visualization

We Need More Research on Data Visualization

Stephanie's Note: Dr. Sena Sanjines just wrapped up her dissertation, part of which measured whether my Data Visualization Checklist is worth its salt. Here are her findings. My name is Sena Sanjines and I’m an evaluator in Hawai‘i slightly obsessed with figuring out...

Journey Maps

Journey Maps

Stephanie's Note: This blog post, guest authored by Evergreen Data Senior Associate Jenny Lyons, is part of our ongoing effort to identify, explore, and popularize qualitative data visualization possibilities. See our collection of qualitative viz options here. All of...

508 Compliance Tools

508 Compliance Tools

If you aren't worried about being 508 compliant, you should be. A part of the Americans with Disabilities act, being 508 compliant means that the stuff you post on your website should be accessible to anyone with a disability. Back when this was first announced, in...

For the Love of Font Size

For the Love of Font Size

Did you know that you regularly read type set in size 8, or even smaller? In printed materials, captions and less important information (think: photograph credits, newsletter headline subtext, magazine staff listings) are usually reduced to something between 7.5 to 9...