Blog

Slidedeck Planning Sheet

Slidedeck Planning Sheet

Holster that mouse! Before you crack open PowerPoint to crank out some slides, take a step back and sketch. Your time in front of the computer will be far more productive (as in, you’ll save hours roaming stock photo sites) if you think through your slides on paper before you design them electronically.

SlidedeckSketchI used to just print off a blank slidedeck of six slides on one page from PowerPoint and start my sketching. You’ll see here that I’m not making anything super beautiful or artistic. Those are really crude sketches! They eventually turned into this deck:

SlidedeckSketch2And the slide development process was a snap because I already knew what images I was looking for and where I would place them on the slide.

I go through this process so often I made my own Slidedeck Planning Sheet, now downloadable for your use. It looks like this:

SlidedeckPlanningSheetYou list your presentation details at the top, number your slides, sketch your ideas, and jot down a few main points. Spending 20-30 minutes here is like putting time in the bank. Bang!

The awesome Chris Lysy animated a 2 minute trailer for my recently released book, Presenting Data Effectively. Check it out – it’s so cool!

This month I kick off my webinar series, with a 90-minute session on reporting well. Next month, slides. January, data visualization

2 thoughts on “Slidedeck Planning Sheet
  1. Craig Hadden – Remote Possibilities says:

    Thanks for sharing this tool, Stephanie. I applaud you for working out ideas before opening PowerPoint!

    It struck me how visual a tool this sheet is. Do you begin by writing down ideas, or do you use the sheet to start the planning process?

    I’ve heard Nancy Duarte suggest sketching on Post-It notes so you can swap them around.

    For myself, I prefer working out ideas in words first, which can make it easier to spot any weak link in my thinking. Then I come up with a visual for each idea, which is when the slides form.

    You might enjoy this post on “slide slavery” (i.e. the perils of designing in PowerPoint). It features advice from Nancy, Garr Reynolds, and Scott Berkun (author of Confessions of a Public Speaker). Would be interested to hear your thoughts.

    Again, thanks for sharing.

    • Stephanie Evergreen says:

      I definitely started with sketching on Post-its but found I lost some of the overarching detail I needed to keep in mind, like audience, theme, etc. I guess the main idea is just to do what works best for you: this template, blank slides, post-its, whatever. Just sketch the idea first!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

RT @RadPresenters: We're joined by author, presenter, and speaking coach @AlanHoffler on this week's episode… https://t.co/4QZvAYmbiQ https…

Thought about @presentationzen while making these Wookie Cookies #MayTheFourth https://t.co/OPw5MRoAFt

RT @Lindasbaker: Weingart Foundation did away with trad. reports, substituted a survey on organizational health/effectiveness PLUS a conver…

RT @maartenzam: @evergreendata They make me happy too :-) https://t.co/jA6Rr8g9Um Will you share this?

@maartenzam yes yes yes! Thanks!

Working on something pretty rad for you https://t.co/9R5OmCw2C0

Honored to be part of @visualisingdata 's 6 Questions series https://t.co/jo3fl19ny7

RT @visualisingdata: NEW POST: 6 questions with... Stephanie Evergreen (@evergreendata) https://t.co/egMMztkyb5 https://t.co/pyC2yrU0h3

RT @RakeshMohanEval: Slides of my Monday's presentation at #EERS16: Speaking the Language of Sponsors & Stakeholders. @EasternEval #eval ht…